SOUTHWEST LINCOLN COUNTY WATER DISTRICT

NEWSLETTER AND CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT

May 2017

We are committed to ensuring the quality of your drinking water and to providing excellent service. Your water meets or exceeds all federal and state requirements. This water quality report, required by the Federal Government, is designed to inform you about the quality of the water the District delivers to you every day.  If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regularly scheduled Board meetings.  The regular Board meetings are held on the second Wednesday of every month at the Water District office located at 7740 Highway 101 North at 10 am.

The following people are responsible for ensuring the quality of your drinking water.

Elected Water District Commissioners

Don Tucker     Chairman                   Bob Whitson      Vice-chairman

Gary Hodges    Secretary                  Jon Culton          Treasurer

Bill Turner       Member at Large

 

Water District Staff

Megan Jones                      Office clerk

David Whitlock.                                 Field Superintendent                              Water Distribution Certificate Level 2

Water Treatment Certificate Level 2

Barry Arnold                                     Water Plant Trainee

Mike Dixon                                         Water Distribution                            Water Distribution Certificate Level 2

Cross Connection Specialist, WT1

Water Treatment Certificate Level 1

Zach Forcier                                       Water Distribution                              Water Distribution Level 1

Carla Young                    Finance Officer/Office Manager         Bachelor of Science Degrees in Finance and Accounting

 

Single Resident Water Supply Policy

The District’s policy for supplying water to a single residence is if “a water user’s property is divided” the applicant shall not continue to serve such portion of the property with water. Such portion of the property must have a separate water service connection if water is desired. Failure to install a new connection will justify turning off the water supply serving the property. A copy of the complete policy is available at the District Office.

If you are a single residence water user but do not receive a water bill directly from SWLCWD (in accordance with SWLCWD policy), then you are receiving water thru someone else’s service meter and piping. SWLCWD cannot accept any responsibility for health risks associated with any such secondary water service hookup nor can it assure that water use charges to you by the person responsible for the service meter do not exceed normal SWLCWD charges for direct single residence service. Please call the District Office at the number given above if you have any questions regarding this policy.

Water Sources The District gets its raw water from the following surface water sources located within the Siuslaw National Forest: Starr Creek, Big Creek and Dicks Fork of Big Creek. The District also takes water from Vingie Creek at a location on private land. Two water treatment plants treat this water – Blodgett Treatment Plant and Dicks Fork Treatment Plant.  The District has developed a Watershed Protection Plan, which outlines what needs to be done to assure that the Water District’s raw water sources are not compromised or polluted.  As a customer of the District, you can help assure that the raw water supply remains of the highest quality.   Do not pollute your water supply by dumping anything in the forest.  Report any dumping you may see to the U.S. Forest Service or the Water District.

Water Distribution System The Water District’s distribution system is in very good condition. All leaks discovered are repaired immediately. The Water District asks that our customers use their water supply responsibly and report any possible leaks in our system so that Water District personnel can investigate and take appropriate action.

We have moved our shop next to the Blodgett Water Treatment Facility, out of the Tsunami Zone.

Water Quality Federal and State laws require Southwest Lincoln County Water District to routinely monitor your drinking water for 79 possible contaminants. All drinking water, including bottled water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791). We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements.  The following table shows the results of our monitoring.  Test dates and the date of the next tests are shown below each of the listed test results.  The table lists only those contaminants that were detected in the water. Copies of the complete reports are available at the District office. You will find some terms and abbreviations you might not be familiar with in this table.  To help you better understand these terms, we’ve provided the definitions for those terms used in the table:

Violation – N – there is no violation, Y – there is a violation.

Detection Level (DL) = A number representing the amount of contaminant present in a sample.

Unit of Measurement (UoM) – used to show comparative volume of contaminant present in a sample (see Following):

Parts per million (ppm) or milligrams per liter (mg/l) – one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) – one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000

Years or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) – Picocuries per liter is a measure of the radioactivity in water.

Million Fibers per Liter (MFL) – million fibers per liter is a measure of the presence of asbestos fibers that are longer than 10 micrometers.

Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) – Nephelometric turbidity unit is a measure of the clarity of water.

Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the average person. 

Action Level – the concentration of a contaminant, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements the water system must follow.

Variances and Exemptions (if applicable) – State or EPA permission not to meet an MCL or a treatment technique under certain conditions. (These are infrequently given in Oregon.)

Treatment Technique (TT) – A treatment technique is a required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Treatment Plant (TP) The District has two treatment plants—Blodgett and Dicks Fork.

Maximum Contaminant Level – The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.  MCL’s are set at very stringent levels.  To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal – The “Goal” (MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) – The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDLG) – The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

Million fibers per liter (MFL) – A measurement for asbestos cement in mater mains

Millirems per year (Mrem/yr) – A measurement for materials that are radioactive.

Next Compliance Period (NCP) – No samples are required until the date set by the Department of Human Services-Drinking Water Program. 

TEST RESULTS                                                         TEST STANDARDS 

 Contaminant  Violation    DL    UofM  MCLG   MCL  Likely Source of Contamination

Microbiological Contaminants

Total Coliform

Bacteria

(sampled monthly)

   N     0 Presence of Coliform Bacteria in 5% of monthly samples  Naturally present in the environment
Turbidity

Blodgett TP

 

Dicks Fork TP

(sampled daily)

   N

 

 

   N

Low         high

.024     .295

.033       .205 Avg.

.028       .239

.032       .148 Avg.

 NTU   N/A  

0.3 ntu’s

Soil runoff

Radioactive Contaminants

Alpha emitters

Last test   2008

Next test 2017

   N    ND

2.3

 pCi/L     0     15 Erosion of natural deposits
Beta/photon emitters

Last test   2008

Next test 2017

   N    ND  Mrem/

yr

    0     4 Decay of natural and man-made deposits
Combined radium

Last test   2008

Next test   2017

   N    ND  pCi/L    0     5 Erosion of natural deposits

 Inorganic Contaminants

 Asbestos

Last test     2008

Next test     2017

   N    ND   MFL     7    7 Decay of asbestos cement water mains; erosion of natural deposits
Arsenic

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test     2010

Next test     2017

 

   N

   N

 

ND

ND

  ppm 0.005 0.010 Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes
Sodium

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test   2008

Next test     2017

   N  

9.48

8.43

  ppm Rain water; Chemicals used in treatment process
 Sulfate

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test     2008

Next test     2017

   N  

3.97

3.71

  ppm  250 Chemicals used in treatment process
Nitrate

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

(Last test   2016

Next test     2017

 

N

   N

 

0.28

0.14

  ppm  10 10 Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

  Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides

 All SOC’s

Last test     2014

Next test   2020

N    ND   ppb 70 70

Volatile Organic Contaminants

All regulated VOC’s

Last test     2014

Next test     2020

   N    ND
Unregulated VOC

Chloroform

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test     2014

Next test     2020

 

 

N

N

 

 

0.0058

0.0047

  ppm Byproduct of drinking water chlorination.

(TTHM)

Unregulated VOC

Dibromochloro-methane

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test     2014

Next test     2020

 

 

N

N

 

 

0.0037

0.0032

  ppm Byproduct of drinking water chlorination.

(TTHM)

Unregulated VOC

Bromodichloro-methane

Blodgett TP

Dicks Fork TP

Last test     2014

Next test     2020

 

 

 

N

N

 

 

 

0.0058

0.0046

  ppm Byproduct of drinking water chlorination.

(TTHM)

TTHM

Hemlock (NOV.)

Last test   11/2016

Next test   11/2017

 

N

 

 

.0145

 

 

  ppm 0   0.08 Byproduct of drinking water chlorination.
Haloacetic Acids (Haa5)

Hemlock (Aug.)

Last test 8/2016

Next test   8/2017
 

 

N

 

 

 

 

.0062

 

  ppm     0     0.06 Byproduct of drinking water chlorination.

DEFINITIONS:

Turbidity Turbidity in itself has no health effects. However, turbidity can interfere with disinfection and provide a medium for microbial growth. Turbidity may indicate the presence of disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses and parasites that can cause symptoms such as nausea, cramps, diarrhea, and associated headaches.

Asbestos  Some people who drink water that contains asbestos in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of developing benign intestinal polyps.

Arsenic Some people who drink water that contains arsenic in excess of the MCL over many years could experience skin damage or problems with their circulatory system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Nitrate Infants below the age of six months who drink water that contains nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue-baby syndrome. As a precaution we always notify physicians and health care providers in this area if there is ever a higher than normal level of nitrates in the water supply.

TTHMs [Total Trihalomethanes] Some people who drink water that contains trihalomethanes in excess of the MCL over many years may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous systems, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.  The District began testing in 2001 (although not required until 2008) and the results so far show that we are well below the proposed limits set by the government.

TOCs (Total Organic Carbon) TOC has no health effects; however, TOC provides a medium for the formation of disinfection byproducts (DBPs). These byproducts include trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs).  Drinking water containing these byproducts in excess of the MCL may lead to adverse health effects, liver or kidney problems, or nervous system effects, and may lead to an increased risk of getting cancer.

HAAs  (Haloacetic Acids)  Some people who drink water containing haloacetic acids in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.  The District began testing in 2001 (although not required until this year) and the results so far show that we are well below the proposed limits set by the government.

Radioactive Contaminants:
Alpha emitters Certain minerals are radioactive and may emit a form of radiation known as alpha radiation. Some people who drink water containing alpha emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Beta/photon emitters Certain minerals are radioactive and my emit forms of radiation known as photons and beta radiation. Some people who drink water containing beta and photon emitters in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Combined Radium 226/228   Some people who drink water that contains radium 226 or 228 in excess of the MCL over many years may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

Total Coliform   Coliform bacteria are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, bacteria may be present.  When coliform are found in more samples than allowed, this is a warning of potential problems.  The District has no coliform.

Substance Units  Goal

 

  Action

    Level

90th

Percen-tile

Homes Exceeding

Action Level

Com-pliance? Source of Contaminant
 Copper

Last test  2014

Next test 2017

 ppm   1.3     1.3    0.002           0     yes Corrosion of household plumbing systems
 Lead

Last test  2014

Next test 2017

 ppb    0   0.015    .047           0     yes Corrosion of household plumbing systems

The 90th percentile is the highest result found in 90% of the samples when they are listed in order from lowest to the highest results. EPA requires testing for lead and copper at the customer’ taps most likely to contain these substances based on when the house was built.  The EPA determined that if the sample results exceeded the action level, the Water District must take action to reduce the risk of leaching of lead and copper.  As you can see by the table above, your water was well below the action level on our last round of testing in 2014.  Our next testing is scheduled for the summer of 2017.

Copper. Copper is an essential nutrient, but some people who drink water that contains copper in excess of the action level over a relatively short amount of time could experience gastrointestinal distress. Some people who drink water that contains copper in excess of the action level over many years could suffer liver or kidney damage. People with Wilson’s Disease should consult their personal doctor.

Lead.  If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Southwest Lincoln County Water District is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

As you can see by the table, our system had no violations. The EPA has determined that your water IS SAFE at these levels.  Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants and more information about contaminants and their potential health effects are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791).

All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by substances that are naturally occurring or man made. These substances can be microbes, inorganic or organic chemicals and radioactive substances. All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. Again, more information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

In our continuing efforts to maintain a safe and dependable water supply it may be necessary to make improvements in your water system. The costs of these improvements may be reflected in the rate structure. Rate adjustments may be necessary in order to address these improvements.

Thank you for allowing us to continue providing your family with clean, quality water this year. In order to maintain a safe and dependable water supply we sometimes need to make improvements that will benefit all of our customers. These improvements are sometimes reflected as rate structure adjustments. Thank you for understanding. Please call our office if you have questions.

We at Southwest Lincoln County Water District work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap. We have in place a Cross Connection program in order to protect our customers and our Distribution system. If you have any questions or would like us to do a survey to see if you have a potential cross connection please call the office. We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

The staff and board at Southwest Lincoln County Water District ask and support our customers in an effort to conserve water usage.

For more information on ways to conserve water please visit http://www.oregon.gov/owrd/pages/water conservation.aspx.

The Water District’s CCR reports are now available by request at our office or posted  at the following URL  www. swlcwd.org